animated GIF

Happy New Year of the Pig!

An animated gif of a chinese new year pig sucking up everlasting noodles.

Pigs have a reputation for gluttony but, apparently, this is undeserved as they only eat until they’re full. Being from a culture that greets each other with Have you had your rice yet? I don’t need much prompting to talk about food, so this seems like a good opportunity to mention some foods that are traditionally included in a Chinese New Year meal. Traditional foods are always symbolic, it’s all about bringing luck and fortune to those who consume it. But, from what I can tell, this association with good fortune is based on the tenuous rule of ‘looks like or sounds like’! (If you read last year’s post you’ll know how confusing the Chinese language can be, as it’s packed with similar sounding words with completely different meanings). So, here’s something to think about while you’re eating:

fish – Yu sounds a bit like the word for abundance or surplus. The fish should be served whole, with its head and tail intact. When placing the dish on the table, point the head toward your most honoured guest or respected elder. Don’t be tempted to eat it all, this symbolises surplus, remembr!

noodles – Noodles are symbolic of longevity because they’re … long. Obviously extra-long noodles are preferable and be careful not to cut them in the cooking process.

dumplings – Their shape resembles the ancient gold ingots which were used as currency. The more dumplings you eat, the wealthier you will be in the coming year. Any excuse!

fat choy – Unfortunately named, as far as I’m concerned, fat choy sounds like the Cantonese phrase meaning to have great prosperity, as in the New Year greeting Gung Hei Fat ChoyFat choy also translates as hair vegetable. It looks like black hair, is eaten as a vegetable but is in fact a type of photosynthetic bacteria found in the Gobi Desert (bet you weren’t expecting that!)

spring rolls – Fried. Looks like gold bars

satsumas, kumquats – Looks AND sounds like gold (gam)!

Year cake – Nian gao sounds like year high. This isn’t cake as you’d imagine it. It’s a thick paste of glutinous rice flour, brown sugar and Chinese red dates, set into a cake shape which is then sliced and fried. FRIED!

February 5th 2019 welcomes the Chinese New Year of the (earth) Pig. People born in the year of the Pig are thought to be responsible, determined, good-tempered and compassionate, though perhaps a little gullible. If you were born in 2007, 1995, 1983, 1971, 1959, etc., this is your year!

Gung Hei Fat Choy! Nian nian gao gao! (That’s Wishing you great prosperity with year on year success! not Wishing you black hair with year after year of cake! though that sounds pretty good too.)

Mo and Dave

Happy New Year of the Fire Rooster

Fire Rooster animation

I’m about to astound you with a piece of knowledge that somehow evaded me til now, despite growing up in a Chinese family – the Chinese lunar calendar has a leap month! I know!!

It seems that lunar months are just 29 or 30 days long, shorter than the ones we use in the Gregorian calendar. So some years squeeze in a 13th month. In effect, the lunar calendar has a whole month added every 3 years or so. But its position in the year varies and, to add more confusion, the extra month has the same name as the previous one! No mere mortal can be bothered to calculate when it’s going to happen because it’s far too complicated, so we all just wait until the Chinese calendars are printed and released into the wild. In lunar leap years though, Chinese New Year tends to fall earlier than usual, in January rather than February.

28th January 2017 begins the year of the Rooster, the fire Rooster to be precise. Roosters are thought to be hard-working, resourceful, confident, active and like being centre of attention! If you were born in 2005, 1993, 1981, 1969, 1957, 1945, you are most probably a Rooster. More importantly though, 2017 also has a leap month which falls after June. So, whatever doesn’t go well in June you can have another go at in the following month – the ‘yun’ version of June (which loosely translates as enriched or nourished)!

Here’s wishing you a happy and enriching year of the fire Rooster!
Kung Hei Fat Choi
Mo and Dave (aptly aka The Cockburns)

Happy New Year of the Monkey!

One of the joys of Chinese New Year is that celebrations traditionally go on for 16 days … so there’s plenty of time to send out new year greetings!!

2016 begins the year of the Monkey. In celebration of this we thought we’d share with you a story of great achievement in a tiny monkey’s life:

An animated monkey in a space suit trying to grab a banana.

Miss Baker – The first American astronaut to survive a trip into space
On May 28th 1959, Miss Baker (a tiny squirrel monkey) and Able (a slightly bigger rhesus monkey) blasted off on a 16 minute mission into space. For the first time the NASA rocket and its astronauts returned safely home. Previous to that, only fruit flies and corn seeds had survived the journey. Sadly though Able died only four days later.

After a flurry of media attention (including an appearance on the cover of Life Magazine) Miss Baker retired from the space business. She went on to have a long and pampered life, during which she lived on cottage cheese and bananas and received fan mail from thousands of schoolchildren. She was married twice, first to Big George and then to Norman, neither of whom went anywhere special or did anything of note.

Miss Baker passed away in 1984 aged 27, at that point also holding the record for longest living squirrel monkey. She is buried at the US Space and Rocket Centre in Alabama where, to this day, admirers leave bananas on her headstone.

If you were born in : 1932, 1944, 1956, 1968, 1980, 1992, or 2004, you are a Monkey and this is your year!

Some monkey ‘facts’:
Monkeys are witty, intelligent (obviously) and mischievous. They are hard workers, fast learners and crafty opportunists.
Lucky numbers: 1, 7 and 8
Lucky colours: white, blue and gold
Lucky directions: north, northwest and west (really?)
Lucky fruit: bananas (not really)

Kung Hei Fat Choi!
Mo and Dave

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